Repertoire

The list of 20 pieces we will be practising in 2016.  The following table has examples of what we could include :-

Title Composer
Link
 Portsmouth Chimes
  Edrich Siebert  
 Spa-nopedie  Claire Wren
 Banding Together
 Those Magnificent Men
 Ron Goodwin
 Banding Together

Practice Notes

Those Magnificent Men

Note: This is taken from one of Claire's emails before the rep weekend.

I couldn’t find a performance of this piece even though J25 has played it in a couple of concerts. I only have some very early rehearsals when we were trying to get it together and mostly failing. John Hammonds has sent me a computer generated mp3 from his score to give everyone an idea of how it goes. Please note, this play through doesn’t go back to the sign but straight into the coda (not recommended, don't try this at home).  Obviously we will go back to the sign so we get another chance to go Up – Down!  I’ll bring the Swannee Whistle.

Things to note:

Syncopation:This is when the weight/accent falls on to a naturally weak beat rather than the strong one.  Some people find this hard and want to place everything tidily on the pulse. In 2/4 there are 4 quavers in the bar 1+2+. The pulse falls on the first quaver of beats 1 and 2 (the bass playing crotchets on each beat: oom – pah/Left - Right etc.). The quavers falling on the intervening “+s” are weak beats. In syncopation the weak beats are made unexpectedly the strong beat. Thus, in the opening lyric, the first word “Those” falls on the + of 1 rather than the 1 itself (am I making sense here?). This gives the swingy/jazzy feel to the music. Rules: Count in quavers to see where the weak beats become strong.  Detach the preceding quaver so that you land on the syncopated weak quaver with a bit of a bang! 

  • Ties – I mentioned before that ties never complicate anything Remember only the first note of a tie is sounded.The fact the tie sometimes runs across the bar line is not scary. Use a metronome to get the hang of the rhythm by tapping untied. Then hold the tapped tied note whilst the metronome carries on ticking. Rules: Write the counting 1+2+ etc over the quavers in the music.  Use a metronome to practise
    tapping the syncopated rhythm. If you can’t tap it right, you won’t be able to play it right.
  • D.S.al Coda – musical geographyThere are various ways to save space when writing music. You will know about the repeat mark. D.S is another kind of repeat as is its friend D.C. 8 bars after F you will see DS al Coda. DS means Dal Segno: “from the sign”. The sign is at letter A – a sort of S with a line and dots. When you get to the double bar at end of bar 64 you go back to the sign and play from there.al Coda – having gone back to the sign you play
    to the coda sign then jump to the coda. The coda sign, a circle with an add sign through it, is at end of bar 36. You will find “CODA” with a matching circle and cross 10 bars from the end. You jump from end of bar 36 to this spot and play to the end (in this recording the computer has decided not to take any notice of the DS and just ploughs on into the coda - how like a computer!)D.C. is Da Capo and this means go back to the very beginning. Rules: Scan your music for signposts to help with the geography. If you get lost you won’t be able to play anything!

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Spanopedie

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Portsmouth Chimes

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